All Articles: Book/Movie Reviews

Government worker’s job to destroy millions of lives

By Juan Haines Senior Editor Adolf Eichmann was a regular guy who found his calling by being an efficient government worker. A deeper look into his life reveals a not-so-average guy who had failed in many things, including academically and at several jobs. Nevertheless, he was a dedicated public servant and a pretty good community […]

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The powerful voice of Jennifer Richter

By Juan Haines Poetry has always had the ability to make me, unintentionally, think of things or someone in unexpected ways. So, when I pick up a poem, I am open to finding out what the writer is trying to say through the combination of words that have a rhythm or cadence that just sounds […]

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The hopeful resilient human spirit behind bars

By Juan Haines Zek: An American Prison Story (2016), by Arthur Longworth, captures the tedious and mundane, the miserable and disappointing, the irrational and vicious aspects of doing time behind bars. But it also offers keen assurance that, in spite of these highly toxic dynamics, the resilient human spirit retains the ability to hold on […]

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A Look Back Into Voting History of Minorities

By Juan Haines A coalition of America’s minorities, voting with liberal Whites, could dramatically change the nation’s political landscape, a progressive author says. However, disenfranchisement laws diminish the impact of the largest minority group, African-Americans. States throughout the country have varying laws that play a role in taking away a person’s right to vote. In […]

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Boy’s Childhood Engulfed in a Decade-Long Civil War

By Juan Haines The first time Ishmael Beah held an AK-47 rifle, it stood nearly as tall as he did. Later the teenager talked about a contest that involved slicing a man’s throat. This was Beah’s childhood after he was recruited by a government lieutenant to fight a rebel army in Sierra Leone’s decade-long civil […]

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Man Grapples with Retaliation and Revenge

By Juan Haines When Tobias Wolff came to San Quentin State Prison on June 15 to sit in Zoe’s Class-Creative Writing, the class had already read his short story, The Chain. The story begins with Brain Gold remembering the day a dog on a chain attacked his daughter. It should be put down. It was […]

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The Love Between a Boy and His Dog

By Juan Haines Senior Editor Ever since I’ve known Tommy Winfrey, he’s been an inspiring and honest teller of tales. His storytelling abilities were acknowledged when he won first prize in the Memoir Category of the 2016 PEN prison writing contest. Stray is a classic story about the love a boy has for his dog. […]

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The Civil War Through the Eyes of a Protagonist

By Juan Haines Senior Editor The Red Badge of Courage (1895) is a powerful storytelling event, placed during the American Civil War. It is told through the eyes of protagonist, Henry Flemming, referred to as the youth. Author, Stephen Crane uses the youth’s observations while in the mists of battle to give readers an honest […]

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Navigating the New World Through Virtual Reality

By Juan Haines Senior Editor For someone who has never experienced 21st century technology, understanding new technologies, like the internet, can be challenging. But placing these new developments in the context of a world from which you are separated while incarcerated is even harder. Ernest Cline explores these elements in his book Ready Player One […]

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Tomorrowland Inspires Dreamers to Change the World

By Jonathan Chiu Staff Writer Finding solutions to Earth’s biggest problems is a major theme of Tomorrowland, a Disneyland attraction and name of an alternate dimension movie. Casey Newton, the main character in Tomorrowland, is recruited to save the world by Athena, a child android. When murderous robots try to kill them, they turn to […]

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