Author Archives: David Archer

AG Calls for Governors to Assist in Prisoners’ Re-Entry

By David Eugene Archer Sr. The United States Attorney General urged the nation’s governors to help released prisoners obtain state-issued identification – one part of a multi-pronged effort to ease reentry back into society. AG Loretta Lynch has testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee about the Justice Department’s plan to help the 600,000 state and […]

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Report of Corrections Corporations of America by the Numbers

By David Eugene Archer Sr. The July/August issue of Mother Jones (MJ) magazine portrays Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) in great detail. The nation’s second-largest private prison company, based in Nashville, began operations in 1983 in a motel in Houston, Texas. CCA now houses more than 66,000 prisoners in 61 facilities across the nation. It […]

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Texas Detention Centers Holds Immigrant Families, Including Children

By David Eugene Archer Sr. Two Texas detention prison-like facilities are holding immigrant families, including children, according to The Christian Science Monitor. The Karnes City center holds 500 beds for immigrants apprehended in the US. Last year a judge ruled that it would have to refrain from keeping children there, as it did not meet […]

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Private Prisons Corporation Extends California Lease

By David Eugene Archer Sr. Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) has announced a four-year extension of its lease agreement for the California City Correctional Center with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR), reported Globe Newswire. CCA agreed to extend the lease through Nov. 30, 2020, during which time CCA will provide up to […]

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Jails’ and Prisons’ Poor Healthcare Burdens Communities

By David Eugene Archer Sr. Poor medical care in jails and prisons is contributing to poor health in some communities, the Vera Institute of Justice reports. “The burden of disease behind bars is unacceptably high and largely invisible to the health system, and the negative impacts of incarceration on the health of communities is a […]

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Prisoners’ Hep C Treatment Is Effective But More Costly

Treatment for Hepatitis C in California prisons is now more effective but much more costly, according to a report. About 17,000 prisoners in California have tested positive for Hepatitis C though health officials suggest the actual number is probably much higher, according to George Lavender for MarketPlace. “… It’s a question of spending now versus […]

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Former Senator Supports Juveniles’ Second Chance

By David Eugene Archer Sr. Journalism Guild Writer A former United States senator says he committed some serious crimes as a juvenile, and he supports giving youthful offenders a second chance. Former Wyoming Sen. Alan K. Simpson made the revelation in a My Voice column published Feb. 11 in the Argus Leader of Sioux Falls, […]

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San Diego DA Reviews Possible Wrongful Convictions

By David Eugene Archer Sr. The San Diego County district attorney has launched a team to review possible wrongful convictions, according to the San Diego Union-Tribune. District Attorney Bonnie Dumanis is formalizing her office’s efforts to review troublesome convictions by creating a team of two full-time prosecutors to investigate claims of innocence, said reporter Kristina Davis. […]

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California Revamps Penal System After Decades

By David Eugene Archer Sr. Journalism Guild Writer California is radically revamping its prison system in response to a national movement to reduce mass incarceration. After decades of being tough on crime, the state is shifting to an emphasis on crime prevention and criminal rehabilitation, reports the San Francisco Chronicle. The state was forced to […]

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Treatment Costs of Hep C for Inmates on the Rise

By David Eugene Archer Sr. Journalism Guild Writer Only a few states and the federal government have increased spending on a new generation of drugs to treat hepatitis C, reports The Marshall Project. An estimated 3.5 million people in the U.S. are infected with hepatitis C, and a third of them pass through prisons and […]

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